Monthly Archives: March 2016

Husbands of happy and more-educated wives are more likely to get a colonoscopy

Science Life

Dale scope 2 William Dale, MD, PhD, Chief of the Section of Geriatrics & Palliative Medicine, associate professor of medicine, and director of the SOCARE Clinic (Robert Kozloff/The University of Chicago)

If your wife says she loves you…check it out

A national study involving 804 couples found that married men over age 55 were almost 20 percent more likely to have had a screening colonoscopy in the previous five years than men who were not married. Men married to women who are happier with the marital relationship were nearly 30 percent more likely. That rises to more than 40 percent if their wives were highly educated.

For women, however, being married, happily or otherwise, made no significant difference compared with unmarried women. Neither the relationship happiness nor education levels of their husbands appeared to change colonoscopy rates for wives.

“Women are thought to control the health capital in most households,” explained study director

View original post 605 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Trumping the Second City

I usually love living in Chicago — a vibrant place full of character. Today, the private satisfaction of living here was scarred by the public embarrassment of being here.

I worked very hard in my SOCARE clinic today, seeing a variety of people from across the spectrum of patients we typically see: African Americans from the inner city south side, rural whites from nothern Indiana, and University of Chicago ex-faculty from Hyde Park. A colleague was out, but his patients were mistakenly scheduled, so I saw some of them on his behalf, doing my best to be helpful. Worked with the usual mix of co-workers from a potpourri of backgrounds, working harmoniously to deliver high-quality care under difficult cirsumstances. I honestly have no idea what anyone’s political views are, only a shared sense of mission against a common foe — cancer and the challenges of aging.

The workday ended long after everyone else had left, sharing a pleasant conversation with an oncology colleague, after a joint-consultation with a dying patient, both of us exhausted from a volatile mix of seeing too many patients, satisfied with having given our best efforts, and frustrated with the amount of work ahead of us over the weekend. Emotionally spent, but alive with the effort. 

On the way home, the forgotten trauma of politics in a city rich in such history, emerged through my car radio. This evening at UIC, a Trump rally was scheduled, a counter-protest was launched, the event was cancelled, and the police had to break it up. I dislike the behavior of everyone who feel hate and violence are a good answer to political differences, and I’m a little embarrassed for our city displaying this silliness. Rally, protest, or whatever you’d like, but don’t be hooligans.

Driving sadly through the south side to the athletic club where my boys are doing gymnastics, forcing my exhausted mind and body through a modest workout while watching my city’s worst side splashed across TV screens on the wall, displaying its bottom to the world, Trump’s face plastered everywhere, angry faces yelling all around, I felt annoyed.  Switching to my Twitter and FB feeds, I found they contained far too much contentless support for one side or the other, invective flung with little thought, emotions bubbling over at the evilness of Others, increasing my sadness for Chicago.

I truly wish people would spend more time trying to make the world a better place through their own efforts, rather than tearing down some other part, and ignoring the mocking Fool at the center of it all.

Leave a comment

Filed under Chicago, Politics